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3 edition of epidemiology of hemolytic streptococcus found in the catalog.

epidemiology of hemolytic streptococcus

Alvin Frederick Coburn

epidemiology of hemolytic streptococcus

during World War II in the United States Navy

by Alvin Frederick Coburn

  • 348 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published by Williams & Wilkins in Baltimore .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • United States. -- Navy,
  • Streptococcus pyogenes.,
  • World War, 1939-1945.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementAlvin F. Coburn and Donald C. Young.
    ContributionsYoung, Donald Cook, 1898-
    The Physical Object
    Paginationix, 229 p. :
    Number of Pages229
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14191352M

      Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae is a recently described streptococcus that is phenotypically and genetically distinct from Streptococcus pneumoniae and other viridans streptococci. Key characteristics of S. pseudopneumoniae are the absence of a pneumococcal capsule, insolubility in bile, resistance or indeterminate susceptibility to optochin when incubated in 5% CO2 but Cited by:


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epidemiology of hemolytic streptococcus by Alvin Frederick Coburn Download PDF EPUB FB2

Epidemiology. Group A β-hemolytic streptococci are spread by respiratory secretions and fomites. The incidence of both respiratory and skin infections peaks in childhood.

Infection can be transmitted by asymptomatic carriers. Acute rheumatic fever was previously common among the poor; susceptibility may be partly genetic. Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (K), or click on a page image below to browse page by page.

Pregnancy and the puerperium. Many of the factors identified to confer an excess risk of invasive S. pyogenes infection also serve to elevate the risk of susceptibility to a number of infectious diseases.

Two are more specific to S. pyogenes infection: varicella Cited by: Despite its title this book is not strictly an account of the epidemiology of haemolytic streptococci; it is a report of a considerable number of epidemics of strepto-coccal infection occurring in various shore training units of the United States Navy during the years That there was ample material for such a survey is shown by a single fact-that nearly 1,man-days were lost Cited by: More recent research on streptococci demonstrated that the hereditary material was DNA, paving the way to present day molecular and genomic studies.

This book is focused on one of the streptococci, Streptococcus pyogenes (the group A Streptococcus), the bacteria responsible for diseases, such as scarlet fever, pharyngitis.

Abstract. Background. Invasive group A Streptococcus (GAS) infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality rates. We report the epidemiology and trends of invasive GAS over 8 years of surveillance. Methods. From January through Decemberwe collected data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Active Bacterial Core surveillance, a population Cited by:   The impact of obesity and diabetes on the risk of disease and death due to invasive group A Streptococcus infections in adults external icon.

Clin Infect Dis. ;62(7)– Nelson GE, Pondo T, Toews K, et al. Epidemiology of invasive group A streptococcal infections in the United States, – external icon. Streptococcus viridans (alpha-hemolytic strep) is the most common cause of endocarditis after dental or medical procedures.

David B. Haslam, Joseph W. GemeIII, in Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Diseases (Fifth Edition), Viridans streptococci can cause pyogenic infections, including brain abscess and localized intra. David B. Haslam, Joseph W. Geme III, in Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Diseases (Fourth Edition), The genus Streptococcus is more diverse than any other bacterial genus and is the source of considerable confusion with respect to taxonomic classification.

1–3 The system for classifying streptococci was introduced at the beginning of the 20th century and is based on. The bacitracin test is also used to distinguish S. pyogenes from other β-hemolytic streptococci that are PYR-positive, such as S. iniae and S. porcinus. To perform a bacitracin susceptibility test, it is important to make a subculture of the strain to be epidemiology of hemolytic streptococcus book on a sheep blood Cited by: 4.

The frequency and severity of streptococcal infections and their sequelae have declined dramatically in the past century, yet the prevalence of streptococcal infections is still high. The reasons for this decline epidemiology of hemolytic streptococcus book be intimately related to host resistance, virulence of the agent, and environmental factors, especially crowding.

Viable counts of beta-haemolytic streptococci per ml. of saliva were made in the following groups: (1) children with acute streptococcal sore throat, (2) children with acute non-streptococcal sore throat, (3) children who had no sore throat but were streptococcal throat carriers, Cited by: The epidemiology of beta-haemolytic non-Group A streptococci isolated from the throats of children over a one-year period - Volume Issue 1 - N.

Cimolai, L. MacCulloch, S. DammCited by: The nature of infection by the hemolytic streptococcus, the essentials of its epidemiology, and particularly the intimacy of the relationship between it and the development of rheumatic fever have become, well established only in the last 20 years.

A new nephritogenic streptococcus - Volume 67 Issue 4 - Eugenia Duca, Gr. Teodorovici, C. Radu, Alla Vîţaˇ, Paula Talaşman-Niculescu, Elisabeta Bernescu, C. Feldi Cited by: New Mexico Department of Health, Epidemiology and Response Division, Infectious Disease Epidemiology Bureau Page 1 of 4.

Streptococcal Infections (Invasive Group A) Summary. Invasive disease due to group A streptococcus (GAS) is caused by the bacterium. Streptococcus pyogenes. Streptococcus pneumoniae (a major cause of human pneumonia) and Streptococcus mutans and other so-called viridans streptococci (among the causes of dental caries) do not possess group antigens.

Three types of hemolysis reaction (alpha, beta, gamma). Epidemiologic Notes and Reports Group A Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcal Bacteremia -- Colorado, From January through Augustgroup A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus (GABHS) was isolated from blood cultures obtained from 19 patients who had been admitted to a hospital in metropolitan Denver, Colorado.

The epidemiology of hemolytic streptococcus during World War II in the United States Navy, (Book, ) [] Get this from a library.

The epidemiology of hemolytic streptococcus during World War II in the United States Navy. [Alvin Frederick Coburn; Donald Cook Young]. Streptococcus pseudoporcinus, a beta-hemolytic microorganism first isolated from the female gastrourinary tract incross-reacts with serogrouping kits for group B Streptococcus (GBS) and could be misidentified in the laboratory.

The epidemiologic characteristics of this species have not been reported previously, but this organism is thought to be by:   Group A Streptococcus (GAS) species are responsible for a wide variety of human diseases that range from noninvasive, mild infections, such as pharyngitis and impetigo, to life-threatening, invasive conditions, such as bacteremia, pneumonia, necrotizing fasciitis (NF), and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS).

In addition, GAS is responsible for nonsuppurative Cited by: The spread of hemolytic streptococci is traced from man to man in barrack, from barrack to dispensary and from dispensary to all barracks of a camp, from the camp to a naval hospital, from the hospital to all camps on a station and from a station to other naval activities throughout the United States.

Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (groups C and G streptococci [GCS/GGS]) is an increasingly recognized human pathogen, although it may follow indirect pathways. Prospective surveillance of selected households in 3 remote Aboriginal communities in Australia provided GCS/GGS isolates that were emm sequence-typed.

Lancefield group C isolates (GCS) were localized. The authors of this book deserve high praise for the interesting way in which they have assembled a vast mass of material. As they state in the preface, the thought of making nationwide observations on streptococcal activity seemed of only academic interest until lately; the war, however, made the need of practical and essential significance.

All Lancefield group C beta-hemolytic streptococci isolated over 12 months from college students with clinical pharyngitis and age-matched healthy controls were identified.

Clinical features of upper respiratory tract infection and pyogenic pharyngitis as well as colony counts were tabulated for each patient according to throat culture by:   The serological types of haemolytic streptococci in relation to the epidemiology of scarlet fever and its complications - Volume 40 Issue 2 - H.

de Waal Skip to main content Accessibility help We use cookies to distinguish you from other users and Cited by: Background:Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is an uncommon complication of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children.

Few studies examine the Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes associated with HUS. Our objective was to describe the epidemiology of S. Cited by: Pharyngitis is the most common diagnosis linked to antibiotic prescribing for children years of age and the second most common diagnosis linked to antibiotic prescribing for children overall.

1 Though most pharyngitis is viral in etiology, bacterial infection accounts for 20%% of pediatric cases.2, 3 Considerable attention has been given to the diagnosis and treatment of group A beta Author: Holly M.

Frost, Holly M. Frost, Holly M. Frost, Thomas R. Fritsche, Matthew C. Hall. In an investigation of vaginal colonization rates for group A β-hemolytic streptococci, Mead et al. studied vaginal and rectal swab samples obtained from all patients delivering of infants at a Vermont hospital during a month period and showed a % colonization rate for group B streptococcus but only a % colonization rate for Cited by: Study design.

Throat cultures obtained for pharyngitis were assessed at a large community-based health system over 10 years. Epidemiologic and clinical features of children with NGAS were compared with children with group A Streptococcus (GAS) and negative cultures.

Antibiotic prescribing patterns were. This chapter presents the information and the identification schemes which adhere in many aspects to the phenotypic classification system. In a study of the genus Streptococcus based on sequence comparisons of small-subunit (16S) rRNA genes, five species groups of viridans group streptococci were demonstrated in addition to the pyogenic group (beta-hemolytic, large-colony formers.

Prevalence and molecular diversity of invasive Streptococcus dysgalactiae and Streptococcus pyogenes in a German tertiary care medical centre. European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, Vol.

37, Issue. 7, p. Cited by: A compendium of Dr. James Roberts' InFocus columns is available in book form. The page volume, InFocus: Clearly the physician cannot clinically differentiate adenovirus from Group A beta hemolytic strep.

This month's column initiates a discussion of infectious mononucleosis with a focus on epidemiology and pathophysiology. An acute infection of the skin caused by species of STREPTOCOCCUS. This disease most frequently affects infants, young children, and the elderly.

Characteristics include pink-to-red lesions that spread rapidly and are warm to the touch. The commonest site of involvement is the face.

Brundage JF, Gunzenhauser JD, Longfield JN, et al. Epidemiology and control of acute respiratory diseases with emphasis on group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus: a decade of U.S. Army experience. Pediatrics ; BREESE BB, DISNEY FA. Factors influencing the spread of beta hemolytic streptococcal infections within the family group.

Streptococcus agalactiae can cause severe pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis in neonates and remains one of the most prevalent causes of invasive neonatal infections.

Maternal transmission of S. agalactiae during delivery can be prevented by prenatal screening and peripartal antibiotic prophylaxis. Implementation of CDC guidelines for group B streptococci (GBS) disease prevention resulted in a Cited by: A species of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria isolated from skin lesions, blood, inflammatory exudates, and the upper respiratory tract of humans.

It is a group A hemolytic Streptococcus that can cause SCARLET FEVER and RHEUMATIC FEVER. Bacterium (T), LP, MTHU, LA Streptococcus pyogenes, or GAS, displays beta hemolysis.

Some weakly beta-hemolytic species cause intense hemolysis when grown together with a strain of Staphylococcus.

This is called the CAMP test. Streptococcus agalactiae displays this property. Clostridium. This page includes the following topics and synonyms: Streptococcus, Beta-hemolytic Streptococcus, Lancefield Group, Alpha-hemolytic Streptococcus, Non-hemolytic Streptococcus.

Streptococcus pyogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium located within the phylum Firmicutes (Fig. ).Prior to the development of molecular typing techniques, the streptococci were separated into four primary divisions (pyogenic, viridans, lactic and enterococci) based.

Segal and colleagues, from the productive pediatric infectious diseases unit in Beer-Sheva, Israel, report their analysis of data from o children with acute otitis media (AOM) from whom specimens of middle-ear fluid had been obtained and cultured [].Their particular goal was to assess the role of group A β-hemolytic Streptococcus (GAS), or Streptococcus pyogenes, in these cases of Cited by: 9.Abstract.

Despite the common nature of group A streptococcal (GAS) infections, the carrier state of this organism is not well understood. In this article, we review the historical and recent research on the definition, epidemiology, and pathogenesis of the GAS carrier state.Understanding the epidemiology can beneficially impact patient care and public health policies.

Feared for centuries as a major cause of infection-associated morbidity and mortality among infants, children, and adults, infections caused by the Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes) and the associated public health.